Gardens & Grounds

Located in an area of outstanding natural beauty, the hilltop site of the Museum’s home, Claverton Manor, takes full advantage of the spectacular views over the Limpley Stoke Valley and River Avon.

The grounds total some 125 acres, of which 35 are open to visitors. The parkland, with its majestic old cedars, provides a circular walk through ancient meadows, while above the manor a path has been created through woodland.

Remnants of the old Italianate style manorial pleasure gardens and parkland, dating from the 1820s, can be seen within the grounds, including period features such as the grotto, the balustrade and curtain walling, as well as ornamental stone work. This work is attributed to George Vivian, son of the original owner of Claverton Manor, John Vivian.

With the addition of the New American Garden, the grounds now boast the largest collection of American horticultural features in the United Kingdom.

The New American Garden is the first European commission for Washington DC-based landscape architects Oehme, van Sweden (OvS). The planting follows the free-form style made famous by the firm’s founders, Wolfgang Oehme and James van Sweden.

Find out more:

The New American Garden and Mount Vernon